OPINION: Terrorism in 2015

Christian Segers, Staff Writer

  This file is licensed under the creative commons attribution-share alike 3.0 unproved license

This file is licensed under the creative commons attribution-share alike 3.0 unproved license

Despite modern day technologies, terrorism remains a primary threat to every civilization’s way of life.

Although there is more reason than ever to send military force against ISIS, Al Qaeda and other terrorist organizations, the respective governments of numerous nations have failed miserably in prioritizing their efforts to counter the current crisis at hand. Even our own great nation has been reluctant to use force against ISIS.

However, it is difficult to target a terrorist group when our own president refuses to go on the record stating that we are at war with radical Islam. If we as a nation are without the capability of categorizing the threats posed to us, then how can we hope to effectively eliminate the threat? The question remains: what is it going to take to bring America’s top government officials to terms with the growing global presence of the ISIS network?

Not only does our president refuse to call out the masterminds behind so much loss of life, but he has been quoted saying that “ISIS is contained” according to The Week Magazine.

Midway through November, there have been over 300 reported terrorism incidents, with the most recent occurring in Beirut, Lebanon and Paris, France.

I’m sorry Mr. President, but there is no adequate reason that can possibly justify the nonchalant attitude in which we have gone about combating the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). Something has to be done to prevent the recent attacks of Beirut and Paris from occurring on American soil. As of right now, there seems to be no plan of immediate action on the presidential schedule.

Perhaps the president should consider increasing air strikes on Syrian encampments in which ISIS has been proven to occupy. According to top Russian government officials, American retaliation towards ISIS has been largely futile due to the lack of clearance given to our fighter pilots upon the distinguishing of their collective targets. The president must green light our military in order to do what is necessary to protect not only America’s interests at home, but to protect a global populous.

In an era where it is virtually impossible to escape the technological warfare advances we possess as a nation, our mission must be to implement our strengths. It is one thing to have the respect from our enemies as to the firepower we possess as a nation and another thing entirely for them to fear our use of that firepower.

One way American citizens can get involved is to petition state legislation to move towards voting on increased military involvement against ISIS. If President Obama refuses to strongly oppose our enemies, then the American people might have to band together in order to overcome the immediate threat that this terrorist organization has became.

The views and opinions expressed in this editorial are solely those of the original author(s) These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of The Vision website or North Greenville University.