Right to Life Rally march inspires NGU students

Miranda Bradford, Assistant Editor

 Students represent North Greenville at the Right to Life Rally held in Washington D.C. on January 24.

Students represent North Greenville at the Right to Life Rally held in Washington D.C. on January 24.

On Monday, January 24 North Greenville University students participated in what they hope turns out as a life-changing march in Washington D.C.

According to March for Life, the Right to Life Rally has become the largest gathering of pro-life advocates who march for their beliefs against abortion.

“People there wanted to let the law makers know that they believe abortion should be outlawed. They wanted to stand up for those who can't stand up for themselves,” said Tony Beam, vice president of student services and christian worldview student advocate. 

A handful of NGU students approached Beam about the rally going on in D.C. and asked if they could go and represent NGU in this protest against abortion.

“I was thrilled that a group of students wanted to go to the march for life,” said Beam. 

“As the future of America, our generation needs to know what is going on in our nation and be active in making it the kind of nation we want to be living in,” said senior Grant Schricker.

“I think it is important for us as students to realize that each one of us has a voice and the ability to use it for causes like abortion and so many others,” said sophomore Charlie Mitchell.

According to Beam, the Millennial generation was the largest group present at the rally, demonstrating that for this generation the argument for pro-life was won. 

 Aivarenga joins fellow NGU students in holding up her pro-life poster for the march against abortion. 

Aivarenga joins fellow NGU students in holding up her pro-life poster for the march against abortion. 

“There are millions who are pro-life and seeing hundreds of thousands of people at the march made me much more hopeful that a day will come when abortion is illegal,” said senior Kiara Aivarenga.

“It was special to see the unity that was found and that even though there may be some different opinions on religion we were all able to agree that life is a gift from God and is something that should be protect, not destroyed,” said Mitchell.

Even though there was a large representation of this younger generation, there are still many who are unaware of this movement. 

“College students have a responsibility to look up from their books so they can form a worldview of their own to make a difference. You need to focus on education, but education should be more than what you get in the classroom. You need to be knowledgeable about the world and laws you have to live under, ” said Beam.  

“Abortion is a serious crime and I encourage everyone to take time to better educate themselves on the topic and to do everything possible to teach others that life starts at conception. I want our generation to be the ones who radically impact this nation for the better and to end abortion once and for all,” said Aivarenga.