8 books every 20-something should read

Shelby Snigar, Staff Writer

Books are good for the mind and soul.  Reading can inspire new passions and show people a world they never would have dreamed of.  Here are eight books that have brought a state of thoughtfulness to readers about the meaning of the story.  

1. "Don't Waste Your Life" by John Piper

 Photo courtesy of desiringgod.org.

Photo courtesy of desiringgod.org.

Life can go by in the blink of an eye.  This book teaches one not to live their life in a bland style.  It teaches them to take risks while staying close to God.  This book will give one a new opportunity to live life like Christ and to gain just as much in death.

2. "Wuthering Heights" by Emily Bontë

 Photo courtesy of goodreads.com.

Photo courtesy of goodreads.com.

"Wuthering Heights" is full of jealousy and loathing, love and hope, and betrayal and lies.  It teaches the reader not to judge people by their outside appearance.  This story also shows how each mistake works itself out into a beautiful ending.

3. "Still Star-Crossed" by Melinda Taub

 Photo courtesy of goodreads.com.

Photo courtesy of goodreads.com.

Romeo and Juliet have just died.  Their story as star-crossed lovers now continues with Rosaline and Benvolio.  Even with hatred strong between Rosaline and Benvolio, their paths must cross.  Will their fates end like Romeo's and Juliet's, or will they change history forever?

4. "The Outsiders" by S. E. Hilton

 Photo courtesy of goodreads.com

Photo courtesy of goodreads.com

"The Outsiders" is similar to the story, "West Side Story."  However, the story is not love story between a man and a woman, but about a love between friends.  This story relates to death and loss, depression and a separation in the aspects of social titles.

5. "The Book Thief" by Markus Zusak

 Photo courtesy of penguinrandomhouse.com

Photo courtesy of penguinrandomhouse.com

World War II is Germany was devastating, especially for those who loved books and were Jewish.  This book represents hard times and even harder decisions.

6. "Delirium" by Lauren Oliver

 Photo courtesy of laurenoliverbooks.com

Photo courtesy of laurenoliverbooks.com

Love is now considered a disease called Deliria and the government has a cure.  Imagine a life without love; without any emotion for the most part.  Take a tour in another version of America in which the government controls all aspects of life and how two teenagers will change that.

7. "Unbroken" by Lauren Hillenbrand

 Photo courtesy of laurahillenbrandbooks.com.

Photo courtesy of laurahillenbrandbooks.com.

 The life of Louie Zamperini will give a reader the insight of life during World War II.  The reader will experience how troubled Zamperini was during his earlier years and what life was like while in the war.  "Unbroken" is a story about a real man who ran in the Olympics and how he overcomes the tragedies set in his way.

8. "Fahrenheit 451" by Ray Bradbury

 Photo courtesy of raybradbury.com

Photo courtesy of raybradbury.com

It is the 24th century.  Books are banned and if you're caught reading, your house is burned down.  Life in Guy Montag's world is very similar to real life's 21st century.  Life is going by in the blink of an eye as people are more interested in electronics instead of nature.  Montag is just realizing this and has a dangerous journey ahead of him.