Mandela Effect: Did that really NOT happen?

Alicia Silvers, Staff Writer 

The “Mandela Effect” is what happens when a large group of people has a clear, personal memory of something that never happened in this reality.  Have you ever seen a logo that looked different that you thought it did before or see a well-known person pass away that you thought passed away a long time ago? You might be experiencing what is known as the Mandela Effect.

The Mandela Effect was named after Nelson Mandela, whom many thought died in prison back in the 1980s when he really died in 2013. Since then, many Mandela Effects have been brought to life.

Many people believe that the Mandela Effect is caused by parallel universes spilling into our own. Some others believe that the Mandela Effect is caused by a time travel, whereas the time traveler goes back in time and accidentally changes small things in the present. Many others believe the phenomenon is simply nothing more than failure of collective memory.

Here is a list of recent Mandela Effects that may surprise you.

Movie Scenes / Titles

“Mirror, Mirror on the wall” was never said / its "Magic Mirror on the wall"

“Luke I am your father”was never said / it's  "I am your father"

Alice in Wonderland (Striped socks or white socks)

Songs

Fred Rogers’ song, “Won’t You Be My Neighbor” (Some recall “It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood”) but it’s (It’s a beautiful day in this neighborhood.)

Deaths

Fidel Castro (some recall 2011 death)

Nelson Mandela (some recall 1980’s death in jail)

Logos/Names

Berenstain Bears / Berenstein Bears

Jif / Jiffy Peanut Butter

Looney Tunes / Looney Toons

Froot Loops / Fruit Loops

Oscar Mayer / Oscar Meyer

Skechers / Stetchers

Definitely / Definately

Cruella De Vil / Cruella Deville

Febreze / Febreeze

Chick-fli-a / Chic-fli-a

*Bolded words are the correct (in this reality anyways :))

More memories can be found at http://mandelaeffect.com/major-memories/

So what do you think?  Do you believe in the Mandela Effect?  Is it just a failure of collective memory?